Join us Tuesday October 24 for our Annual Celebration

Center for Reproductive Rights
25th Anniversary Celebration

Honoring exemplary leaders and voices in the fight for women’s reproductive health and human dignity

Tuesday, October 24, 2017  6:30 p.m.
Reception & Awards Presentation
The Appel Room at Frederick P. Rose Hall
Home of Jazz at Lincoln Center, NYC

Loretta E. Lynch

The Honorable
Loretta E. Lynch

83rd U.S. Attorney General

Loretta E. Lynch was born on May 21, 1959, in Greensboro, North Carolina. She received her A.B., cum laude, from Harvard College in 1981, and her J.D. from Harvard Law School in 1984

In 1990, after a period in private practice, Ms. Lynch joined the United States Attorney’s Office for the Eastern District of New York, located in Brooklyn, the city she considers her adopted home. There, she forged an impressive career prosecuting cases involving narcotics, violent crimes, public corruption, and civil rights, including the high-profile case of Abner Louima, a Haitian immigrant who was sexually assaulted by uniformed police officers in a Brooklyn police precinct in 1997.

In 1999, President Bill Clinton appointed her to lead the office as United States Attorney, a post she held until 2001. In 2002, she joined Hogan & Hartson LLP (now Hogan Lovells) as a partner in the firm’s New York office. While in private practice, Ms. Lynch performed extensive pro bono work for the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda, established to prosecute those responsible for human rights violations in the 1994 genocide in that nation. As Special Counsel to the Tribunal, she was responsible for investigating allegations of witness tampering and false testimony.

In 2010, President Barack Obama asked Ms. Lynch to resume her leadership of the United States Attorney’s Office in Brooklyn. Under her direction, the office successfully prosecuted numerous corrupt public officials, terrorists, cybercriminals and human traffickers, among other important cases.

President Obama announced his intention to nominate Ms. Lynch as Attorney General on November 8, 2014 and she was sworn in as the 83rd Attorney General of the United States by Vice President Joe Biden on April 27, 2015.

Ms. Lynch is the daughter of Lorenzo and Lorine Lynch of Durham, N.C., whose shared commitment to justice inspired her career in public service.

María Teresa Rivera


María Teresa Rivera

Lead plaintiff representing Las 17

Maria Teresa Rivera is a passionate advocate for abortion rights and the world’s first abortion refugee.

Maria Teresa is a native of El Salvador, where abortion is illegal under all circumstances and where a miscarriage, stillbirth, or pregnancy complications can lead to imprisonment. When she had a miscarriage in 2011, Maria Teresa was accused of having sought an abortion. She was convicted of manslaughter and sentenced to 40 years in prison. She served almost five years under harsh conditions, including being forced to sleep on the floor in a severely overcrowded cell. She was unable to see her son, who is now 12 years old.

The Center took on Maria Teresa’s case and those of the other of Las 17 – the 17 women who were imprisoned because of the country’s cruel abortion ban. She and two others have been released. Because of her experience in prison, Maria Teresa became an outspoken advocate for abortion rights, and is now fighting alongside the Center for the release of the others who are still behind bars. She has bravely called attention to the fact that El Salvador’s abortion ban is not only cruel, but is implemented in a discriminatory manner: all the women who are convicted and imprisoned under the ban are poor.

After her release, Maria Teresa was stigmatized and harassed – “they called me a baby-killer” -- and was unable to find a job. Sweden declared that her human rights had been violated, and offered asylum to her and her son – the first time that asylum has been given because of an abortion law. She and her son are building a new life In Sweden.

The Honorable Loretta E. Lynch

83rd Attorney General of the United States

Loretta E. Lynch was born on May 21, 1959, in Greensboro, North Carolina. She received her A.B., cum laude, from Harvard College in 1981, and her J.D. from Harvard Law School in 1984

In 1990, after a period in private practice, Ms. Lynch joined the United States Attorney’s Office for the Eastern District of New York, located in Brooklyn, the city she considers her adopted home. There, she forged an impressive career prosecuting cases involving narcotics, violent crimes, public corruption, and civil rights, including the high-profile case of Abner Louima, a Haitian immigrant who was sexually assaulted by uniformed police officers in a Brooklyn police precinct in 1997.

In 1999, President Bill Clinton appointed her to lead the office as United States Attorney, a post she held until 2001. In 2002, she joined Hogan & Hartson LLP (now Hogan Lovells) as a partner in the firm’s New York office. While in private practice, Ms. Lynch performed extensive pro bono work for the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda, established to prosecute those responsible for human rights violations in the 1994 genocide in that nation. As Special Counsel to the Tribunal, she was responsible for investigating allegations of witness tampering and false testimony.

In 2010, President Barack Obama asked Ms. Lynch to resume her leadership of the United States Attorney’s Office in Brooklyn. Under her direction, the office successfully prosecuted numerous corrupt public officials, terrorists, cybercriminals and human traffickers, among other important cases.

President Obama announced his intention to nominate Ms. Lynch as Attorney General on November 8, 2014 and she was sworn in as the 83rd Attorney General of the United States by Vice President Joe Biden on April 27, 2015.

Ms. Lynch is the daughter of Lorenzo and Lorine Lynch of Durham, N.C., whose shared commitment to justice inspired her career in public service.

María Teresa Rivera

Lead plaintiff representing Las 17 – the El Salvadoran women unjustly imprisoned under draconian abortion laws

Maria Teresa Rivera is a passionate advocate for abortion rights and the world’s first abortion refugee.

Maria Teresa is a native of El Salvador, where abortion is illegal under all circumstances and where a miscarriage, stillbirth, or pregnancy complications can lead to imprisonment. When she had a miscarriage in 2011, Maria Teresa was accused of having sought an abortion. She was convicted of manslaughter and sentenced to 40 years in prison. She served almost five years under harsh conditions, including being forced to sleep on the floor in a severely overcrowded cell. She was unable to see her son, who is now 12 years old.

The Center took on Maria Teresa’s case and those of the other of Las 17 – the 17 women who were imprisoned because of the country’s cruel abortion ban. She and two others have been released. Because of her experience in prison, Maria Teresa became an outspoken advocate for abortion rights, and is now fighting alongside the Center for the release of the others who are still behind bars. She has bravely called attention to the fact that El Salvador’s abortion ban is not only cruel, but is implemented in a discriminatory manner: all the women who are convicted and imprisoned under the ban are poor.

After her release, Maria Teresa was stigmatized and harassed – “they called me a baby-killer” -- and was unable to find a job. Sweden declared that her human rights had been violated, and offered asylum to her and her son – the first time that asylum has been given because of an abortion law. She and her son are building a new life In Sweden.

For more information, contact Ashley McGuire at events@reprorights.org or 917.637.3712.